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adamwarrencomics:

From a recently unearthed copy of Manga Super Techniques dating back to the early 90s, here are four random scans addressing the topic of inking:

Scan #1: Always preferred the “maru” pentip (at the bottom), myself.

Scan #2: Feel kinda bad that I never mastered the art of inking speedlines with a dip pen, as seen at left. (Then again, line-weight variation is possible with a tech pen, through it can be a tad time-consuming.) Also, check out the three variations on speedline usage at right, featuring varying degrees of how much the characters “pop” from the background.

Scan #3: Note the “ruler lift” technique at the bottom; that’s a clever but somewhat challenging way to handle things when your tools lack a raised “inking edge.”

Scan #4: Used this “pushpin” technique a few times myself, as a means to counteract seemingly inevitable “drift-off” from the speedlines’ vanishing point. The pushpin doesn’t work quite so well, howeva, if your drawing surface happens to be harder than wood… My own metal-topped drafting table precludes this approach.

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adamwarrencomics:

Work stages from a riotously character-packed book cover I drew for the pen-and-paper RPG Exalted. Line art by me, colors by Guru eFX.

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tomscholes:

Making of Oppidum: Once the shape language has been established it can be reused and reformed to create new vantages and further the original idea.

(Source: artofscholes.com)

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ungoliantschilde:

Travis Charest ~ Art Process for two of his Star Wars Covers.

(via error888)

Quote
"It looks like a mess usually and I always get a little worried at this stage."

— This bit from around the halfway point of Scott Campbell’s step-by-step account of his painting method should be included in every description of every creative process. (via mrgan)

(via mrgan)

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gurroo:

Mike Mignola tutorial, c.1997. I remember liking this so much I pasted the pages straight into my sketchbook

gurroo:

Mike Mignola tutorial, c.1997. I remember liking this so much I pasted the pages straight into my sketchbook

(via king-mignola)

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tomscholes:

Visualization for a chapter in Oppidum, utilizing the shape language from previous explorations to construct new sentences (concepts). I feel once the grammar is in place you can remix it’s useful properties and further resolve those not yet aligned. In prototyping rapidly and recycling previous success, motivation and efficiency is easily maintained. 

Video

svga:

Making of - Azog - The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey by Weta Digital (by CGMeetUp.net)

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eyecager:

Basic Drawing Expressions

Source: Iain Mc Caig

(Source: eyecaging, via johnsandoval)